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02 March 2011

hold that baby

Yesterday in Melbourne I got this photo of the Manchester Unity facade.
While there I also used an ATM which told me I had zero balance. That's not right, I thought, and pressed 'Withdraw Money' anyhow, and wandered off with my cash.
Today's news of the CommBank software snafu explains it all.

In Sydney there were insane scenes of crowds and cash, but bless his larcenous heart 'Sam of Marrickville got $40' he did not have in his account. $40. Sam seems to know 'context is everything'.

Here is that Manchester Unity facade in context:

In Melbourne 'A 20-year-old man was charged with dishonestly obtaining financial advantage by deception, and my first thought is that new prisons will have to be built if that law was properly applied for godssakes.

Just looked at my account balance and it shows a large balance with no evidence of yesterdays withdrawal.
I feel sorry for the executive in charge of the bank IT
.

13 comments:

  1. For 18 years, I was a member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, which is the American version of the Manchester Unity, but I didn't know yu had either in Australia.

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  2. I wonder if the money is quite as traceable as the bank says it is. Fingers crossed on your behalf.

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  3. I once went to an ATM to withdraw fifty dollars. Out of the shoot spat not one fifty but a number of them. I felt so shocked, pocketed the money and fled feeling like a thief.

    Only later when I got my statement did I realise I had inserted an extra zero and withdrawn not $50 but $500.00. The bank got it right that day, but it felt delicious for a minute to imagine that I'd won the jackpot, free of charge.

    I'm sure the bank will catch up with your withdrawal in time.

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  4. Elisabeth: there is theft and there is 'theft' - banks are fair game since they started charging $35 for a cheque bounced for being 5c over a balance.
    They need to realise how much they are hated.
    I love the scene in Bonnie & Clyde (the movie) where they arrive at a farm just as the banker has told the farmer he is to be evicted.
    "How do you do, I'm Clyde Barrow and this is Bonnie Parker - we rob banks"
    and the farmer says
    "well you just come right in".

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  5. You should have popped into say hello (the building that is, not the moolah)

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  6. you sweet thing Ms AOF - would not have dared to interupt your work.
    from Historum.com I found some IOOF/M.Unity background about widows and orphans:
    'Members in the United Kingdom trace its roots back to the Trade Guilds of the 12th and 13th centuries. Accepted belief is that it emerged in England when a group of working class men who fell outside the established system of trade guilds banded together to form their own labor association. At the time of industrialization in England, ‘Fellows’ from various ‘Odd’ trades gathered together and formed a fraternity to protect and care for their members and communities at a time when there was no welfare state, trade unions and National Health Insurance. They would work together to help each other and the unfortunate families back on their feet, whether it was rebuilding a barn that had burned, or putting in a new crop after a devastating season. Such helpers came to be known as “odd fellows,” so named by the general population who thought they were “an odd bunch of fellows” who would behave in such a selfless and seemingly impractical fashion. This group then adopted the name.

    By year 1700's, there were a number of Odd Fellows organization in England. The earliest surviving documented evidence of an organization called “Odd Fellows” are the minutes of Loyal Aristarchus Odd Fellow Lodge no. 9 in England dated March 12, 1748. By it being number 9, this connotes that there are older Odd Fellows lodges that existed before this date.'

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  7. I also was an Oddfellow for many years. I still am, just somewhat more independently.

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  8. I bet the bank will find a way to charge you for that.

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  9. The IOOF in America is dying out at a tremendous speed due to its inability to attract new members. The Freemasons aren't looking so good either.

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  10. It's about time the Banks got a wake-up call like this. Their electronics systems are way out of date, according to TV news stations and badly need upgrading. We can only hope some of those stupid rules they have will change too, but it's far more likely they'll sneak in extra fees somewhere to pay for the upgrades.

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  11. My daughter's husband works selling and constructing IT for banks and other - it would be a disaster - he trains people to use the tech but sometimes it is not the programme but what someone has fed into it...

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  12. Thank you for being you and for your wonderful posts. I have awarded you a stylish blogger award which you can check out at http://myjustsostory.blogspot.com/2011/03/stylish-blogger-award.html

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