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16 August 2010

On the road

Leaving ...
I will miss the chickens.
I will miss the kangaroos.
I will not miss the creeps who logged away the kangaroo dormitory, and hope they go bankrupt for gouging the earth and spewing diesel fumes 12 hours every day.

I will miss these calves
that I meet every morning at the mailbox.
(poor things live 12 freezing weeks before slaughter so some dolt can get bowel cancer having a 'Parma & Pot $12' at the pub).
I will really miss seeing the sun the very moment the horizon meets it in the morning - it is magically different every time:
... and now I am in Ballarat the city built on gold, leaving slag heaps everywhere
 

18 comments:

  1. In my experience, it is always best to avoid mullock heaps. They scratch.

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  2. Is this what a mullock heap looks like? I've often wondered.

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  3. You are wise and Hot dear Andrew.
    Elisabeth, they used to be called slag heaps and are everywhere around the C146 road. There are heaps of the other slags in The 'Rat, so 'mullock' is the preferred modern term.
    Thank you both for commenting on a post where Picasa got out of control before completion.

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  4. 'Slag Heaps' - surely you're not *that* down on yourself, Ms O'Dyne???

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  5. dear ChocHead Lockett - O'Dyne is the pointy top of any heap of slags, and Ballarat has one of those 5-star Luxe chocolate boutiquey places she will be straight at I reckon:
    Sjokolate
    318 Sturt Street, Ballarat, 5331 9963.
    Chocolatier John Metzke works where customers can watch him in Ballarat's boutique chocolate store. Open seven days (opposite Town Hall)

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  6. I do like Ballarat, so for me the ending is a happy one, but the post oozes grief and sorrow - sorry to hear that.

    Q: why can't you climb on the slags?

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  7. Parting is such sweet sorrow, Ann. And Kath got in first with the gag line about slag heaps, grrr!

    The post is a great little photo essay - showing the whole tableau in just a few evocative shots.

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  8. Welcome Donkeyblogger! Yes I was sorry the owner had to return from his annual 3-month trek across France. Out in the paddocks, the best time of day is dawn and dusk. That dawn moment is worth the click-to-enlarge. How it must have freaked ancient civilisations.
    Lad - there's no slag like old slag and it all contains gold.

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  9. Slag is right, a chocolate boutique and you didn't think to tell me.
    Do they deliver?
    Do they give freebies for tasting?
    Post a list of the yums. Damn I'm drooling.

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  10. Growing up in Port Pirie, my brother and I often played on the slag heaps at the back of the big smelting plant. We searched for gold there too, as the plant smelted gold, silver and lead, but we never found any. After many years of fun there, the company erected giant wire fences to keep kids out, when the dangers of lead poisoning were exposed.

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  11. what a sign (beginning and ending).

    i have bits of slag from decades ago...my g-pa used to work at a copper smeltering plant here. what we didn't know then...huh?

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  12. Sherry, thanks for calling in from Montana to find a connection with River from South Australia. Copper and tin Miners particularly from Cornwall poured in SA in 1850. Moonta SA has a Cornish Festival still.
    The mining industry is the highest-paid per head. not very ecology-conscious though.

    jahTeh? I will definitely let you know.

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  13. What was the web site for the lists thing again?

    My head hurts.

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  14. "...they used to be called slag heaps..."

    Until it became politically incorrect to make jokes about Madonna. Reminds me of a sign round our way that reads: "Beware of Dyke."

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  15. I know what you mean about watching the sun rise in the morning - its something else - and the neighbour's cattle at my front gate - hope the new spot - whats a mullock heap please???

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  16. Thank you Brian - Madge didn't make all that money by being sweet, that's for sure.
    Hi Middle Child: slag is the stuff left over after the miner sieves everything he dug up looking for gold. It piles up into mullock heaps. they are everywhere if you look, when driving through goldrush country - nobody ever cleared them away.

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  17. I spent the first 22 years of y life at Yeodene

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  18. A very HEALTHY place to be young.
    Fresh air etc.
    This weeks Weekly Times has photo of Peter Groves selling his place there.
    November Grogblogs if you like: Monday 22nd The Standard in Fitzroy, after work.

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