Pinterest

21 May 2010

signs of life

Even in the middle of nowhere, my natural habitat, choices are offered if one sees the signs.

24 comments:

  1. Cape Clear would be on the sea then wouldn't it? Non, I think.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Too many choices. Makes me want to run out into the open field.

    ReplyDelete
  3. Cressy sounds like the sort of pointless, backwater place, isolated enough for aliens to visit and satanic rituals to go on behind closed doors. I'd head for that.

    ReplyDelete
  4. and here, i thought i lived in the middle of nowhere, but i see that perhaps you do as well. here, we refer to the center of our "nowhere" as Two Dot. it's an actual place in montana, but i bet you've heard the saying about how "you can't get there from here".

    myself, i'd like to give ballarat a go. what would i see there?

    ReplyDelete
  5. Brian - Cressy has a pub built in 1847 by a Frenchman and still operating, one General Store, and one policeman responsible for a very wide area which is full of farm boys who go to that pub.
    Cape Clear and Illabarook are just names for dots on the map.
    Skipton has a small township and hospital, it is historically the centre of Western District sheep graziers so there has always been Money in the area.
    Sherry - Ballarat is a large regional city which boomed in the 1850 gold rush so it has really substantial historic buildings. There is a tumbleweed town in California named after it.
    Your "you can't get there from here" reminds me of a very recent real story my Cape Clear Road farmer friend told me:
    She was travelling far from home and asked directions in NotReallyATown and got the answer -
    "well I wouldn't start from here".
    So existential!
    Except for the part where everybody makes their living from exploiting animals, I love it out here in the paddocks ... with internet connection of course. I wouldn't like it without that, I must admit.
    Peace and love to you all.

    ReplyDelete
  6. And what is more, none of them point to Magoo!

    ReplyDelete
  7. oh AOF! so true. Cressy sign points South, Skipton West, nothing pointing East and I have thrown away that map.
    'You Can't Go Home Again'
    thanks for the laugh.

    ReplyDelete
  8. How coincidental..I think I stumbled across your blog via the uses for wedding dress site , and saw the photo of this sign post. I must have passed this sign a hundred times. If there was a sign pointing east, it might have my town on it.

    I didn't realise the Cressy pub was still operating. I'd be more than happy to drop in again and have a few with the farmers, lol.

    ReplyDelete
  9. Hi CG - welcome! If you are at Shfrd or Tsdale then I envy you.
    Rkwd not so much unless you are on Wrk*Wrk.
    Cressy pub is off the C146 and is still there, for pix just put (Cressy+Frenchman's) into the search box:
    '65k west on Hamilton Hwy from Geelong, the small town of Cressy is one of Victoria’s older rural towns. It grew round a coach stop on what is now the junction of roads linking Melbourne and Geelong with Port Fairy and Portland.

    Cressy is the anglicised version of the name of the French town of Crecy, home of migrants Frederick and Rosine Duvernay who opened the Frenchman’s Inn in 1840.

    The original pub has long gone, but an inn of the same name preserves the line of Victoria's oldest, continuous hotel licence. A bluestone church built in 1862 provides another link to Cressy’s past.

    The chain of lakes stretching across the volcanic plain that separates Cressy from Colac in the south includes Corangamite, Victoria’s largest saltwater lake.

    Cressy lies about 30km to the east of Lismore on a section of the highway known traditionally as the Wooltrack because of the stream of wool-laden bullock wagons that once plied the trail from the big sheep stations to the west to Geelong.'

    Isn'tthe myexwifesweddingdress.com/ guy just WONDERFUL. I got there via The Daily Mailonline. How did you get there?

    ReplyDelete
  10. For those of you who do not have Feedjit, this is what you see with it:
    Craigieburn, Victoria arrived from myexwifesweddingdress.com

    Bradford UK arrived on "trying to be Ann o'Dyne" 2 hours 19 mins ago.
    Brisbane, Queensland arrived from myexwifesweddingdress.com
    Carlton, Tasmania arrived from bloglines.com
    Billings, Montana left "trying to be Ann o'Dyne" via wyrearchaeology.blogspot.com "

    So 2 of you read my comment at the funny guy's.
    I hope Kass liked Brian's dig.
    Now CG: you just need to make one post - just say 'thanks for swinging by' and then people who follow your comments back, will be able to leave you messages.
    In Settings, tick the box for Word Verification ON or you will get comment spam. Welcome to blogging.

    ReplyDelete
  11. I'm with Brian, except 'Cressy' for me sounds like it's been abbreviated in true Aussie style, like Brissie, rellies, chrissie pressies etc

    ReplyDelete
  12. ... and moccies, Woolies, cabbies, and ... choccies!

    ReplyDelete
  13. As always, great to read your posts,:)

    Huggz,
    randi

    ReplyDelete
  14. "right or left at main Street..."Skipton also has a bit fo a creepy town sound - don't know why

    ReplyDelete
  15. Cressy makes me think of cress sandwiches, which make me think of high tea, which makes me think of scones, which makes me hungry.

    ReplyDelete
  16. "Montana left "trying to be Ann o'Dyne" via wyrearchaeology.blogspot.com"

    I wondered who this week's visitor was.

    ReplyDelete
  17. Go the pub. Crowded in here innit? I strongly do concur, btw and wld coitenly advise anyone not do rural australie without internet connection.

    ReplyDelete
  18. I might be moving to Ballarat.
    How exciting for you.

    ReplyDelete
  19. Which means The RH Temple of Extreme Thought will be on the market:

    $600,000 (house).

    $800.000 (provenance).

    ReplyDelete
  20. Good heavens, I've caused an earthquake.

    Ballarat rattles.

    -Robert.

    ReplyDelete
  21. I would go to Illabarook just to ask why they named it that. It's aboriginal, I suppose, but what on earth does it mean? Here in the U.S., we killed off our indigenous peoples (mostly through disease, but guns helped too), but we kept some of their place names, and then named other things after them. We Americans are very sentimental that way. It's like when we chop down all the trees to build a new subdivision, and then name the subdivision Oak Arbor Acres or Shady Grove Estates.

    ReplyDelete
  22. I live about 30 miles from Skipton - in the UK, though!

    Whenever I see the name Ballarat -which isn't often, here!- I think of the Sherlock Holmes story, The Boscombe Valley Mystery. It features a "Black Jack of Ballarat",

    ReplyDelete
  23. Thank you for your visit Snowbrush and Dominic. Illabarook has a football team, but nothing there you would call a town. It was huge in 1851 when the gold-rush was booming.
    Black Jack of Ballaarat would have been inspired by the many who returned to England having made a fortune on the goldfields. It was big big money.
    Both place-names are Aboriginal, ballaarat is 'swamp' I think, and I will have to look up Illabarook.
    Western Victoria place-names are 25% English, 30% Aboriginal and 45% Scottish. The Western District is bigger than England and has 4 small cities with a lot of nothing between them. No shades of grey out here. I love it.

    ReplyDelete
  24. Andrew - here is the Wiki on the Cape Clear Lighthouse, with a photo of the pub, which makes it look a substantial place ... except there is NOTHING there but the pub.
    Nearby Snake Valley has a general store, primary school and a church.
    The Snake Valley festival weekend is worth a visit so check the date aand visit Derinallum after. The pub there has a good chef.

    ReplyDelete